Episode 10 – Wine Headaches Explained and interview with Emily Miller

Episode 10 – Wine Headaches Explained and interview with Emily Miller

SHOWNOTES
Episode 10 – Wine Headaches Explained and my interview with Emily Miller

Welcome new listeners. I’m so happy to have you.
Creative types and curious listeners…welcome home.
Please poke around and get used to the place.

Consider being a patron for special perks and of course, subscribe to the podcast AND the newsletter (I send something out about twice per month).

One more special announcement:
I will be interviewing and exuberant and insightful Nicole Unice soon and sharing that with you. She has a new book coming out Brave Enough and we’ll chat about it. Very exciting!


 

Today’s episode is brought to you by Soul Care for Creators and Communicators

This book offers a new way to see yourself and your calling.
If you are someone who creates and communicates in everyday life, this is a great read you will enjoy!


WINE SEGMENT

Today, I’m answering the big question I’m asked a lot at the Vineyard: how to avoid a red wine headache and why does it really happen.

…and I’m revealing some other facts about wine grapes.

The real reason people get a headache from red wine?
Histamines.
They are found in the skins of grapes, can give some people headaches if they are sensitive to histamines.  Red wine will affect a histamine sensitive wine drinker more than white wine because red wine has spent more time in contact with grape skins that host the histamines.

Some people think they get headaches because they are allergic to sulfur. Unlikely.
But, only 1% of the population has this allergy.

Other facts:
A serving of wine has only 80-100 calories

One Case of Wine

=30 pounds of grapes

=48 glasses of wine

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Sparking your Muse

emilymillerToday, we welcome journalist, reporter, and writer…

Emily McFarlan Miller

Her twitter address @emmillerwrites

Her website bio is very impressive and full of fun and fascinating stuff. You will find yourself clicking every link! Check it out here.

This was a fun interview!
Emily is a reporter and social media maven for the Chicago Sun-Times. She is also a Relevant magazaine regular contributor .

Most often Emily is asked to write about controversies, but she was happy to share with me good news about some churches making a big positive difference in the world.

We also chat about why we don’t hear more good news about the church. Her answer is very compelling.

Plus, we talk about her fascinating work with Hope for the First Nations, a nonprofit she founded with some friends right after she graduated high school. They partner with the Anishinaabe people of the White Earth Reservation. At the last board meeting, she was voted in as president!


 

Please take part in this anonymous 30-second listener-survey so I can continue to fund and produce the show. Once again, thank you so much for listening.


Spark My Muse is now one of the most popular shows in its category on iTunes
(The Society/Culture- Philosophy category! Just like my hero Krista Tippet’s show On Being.)

All the more reason to be thankful for you!

Spark My Muse

 

C.S. Lewis on longing and friendship

A few tidbits today from a greater mind than mine by a thousand or more:

C.S. Lewis.

jacklewis

Jack, as his friends called him, lived and wrote with an authenticity that made courageously interacting with the most painful and potent stuff of life an ordinary occurrence.

He loved deeply, he thought deeply, he wrote deeply, he suffered deeply. All these things, love, joy, friendship, sacrifice, loss, and longing were the topics of his work.

A heavyweight intellectual with the rare kind of genius to write concisely and accessibly to anyone, he never shied away from the messy parts of life–no matter who the audience. He might be most famous for his children’s fiction, but his poetry, literary criticism, apologetics, and other works reveal him as a polymath and literary giant. Thanks to the recent Hollywood versions of Narnia movies (which ardent C.S. Lewis fans find grossly wanting) ave created a renewed interest in Lewis making him more widely read now than he was in his own lifetime.

What made the man?

Tragedies cultivated a pensive and sensitive aspect of Leiws that complimented an agile, imaginative, and sharp mind.

Perhaps the deepest wound happened at age 9 when he lost his mother in death. His father was emotionally distant and sent him off to a series of boarding schools–which he deplored. The isolation and grief seemed to create a “heart-wound” from which he suffered his whole life; and from which he found solace in the hope of heaven and in the embrace of friendship.

Author Anthony Burgess wrote that “Lewis is the ideal persuader for the half-convinced, for the good man who would like to be a Christian but finds his intellect getting in the way.” (*source)

But, not at first.

First, the pain made him a committed and intellectual atheist at age 14. Despite his choice, Lewis still wrestled with what most creators and artists do, spiritually, as his journal from that time reveals:

“If I find in myself a desire which no experience in this world can satisfy, the most probable explanation is that I was made for another world.”

Later, Jack would reconcile these longings more throughly with theism. (An acceptance of God as Creator.)

Subsequently, he found Jesus Christ the fitting Savior and Redeemer of the story–which is life and human experience. The Savior myths of ancient times and other cultures he said evidenced that the story of God and Jesus was a “true myth” reflected in meta-truth and narrative intwined into the cultural fabric and story of (nearly) every civilization.

He continued to explore this idea of desire and longing–from which any one with an artistic temprament can take confort:

“In speaking of this desire for our own far off country, which we find in ourselves even now, I feel a certain shyness. I am almost committing an indecency.

 

 

I am trying to rip open the inconsolable secret in each one of you—the secret which hurts so much that you take your revenge on it by calling it names like Nostalgia and Romanticism and Adolescence; the secret also which pierces with such sweetness that when, in very intimate conversation, the mention of it becomes imminent, we grow awkward and affect to laugh at ourselves; the secret we cannot hide and cannot tell, though we desire to do both.

 

 

We cannot tell it because it is a desire for something that has never actually appeared in our experience. We cannot hide it because our experience is constantly suggesting it, and we betray ourselves like lovers at the mention of a name. Our commonest expedient is to call it beauty and behave as if that had settled the matter.

 

Wordsworth’s expedient was to identify it with certain moments in his own past. But all this is a cheat. If Wordsworth had gone back to those moments in the past, he would not have found the thing itself, but only the reminder of it; what he remembered would turn out to be itself a remembering.

 

The books or the music in which we thought the beauty was located will betray us if we trust to them; it was not in them, it only came through them, and what came through them was longing.

 

 

These things—the beauty, the memory of our own past—are good images of what we really desire; but if they are mistaken for the thing itself they turn into dumb idols, breaking the hearts of their worshipers.

 

For they are not the thing itself; they are only the scent of a flower we have not found, the echo of a tune we have not heard, news from a country we have never yet visited.”

 

How beautifully he captures longing!

For Lewis, camaraderie, fellowship, friendship, and love brought light and healing to his heart and his world. Through them he remained grounded and prolific.

Lewis on friendship:

In a circle of true Friends each man is simply what he is: stands for nothing but himself. No one cares twopence about anyone else’s family, profession, class, income, race, or previous history.

 

Of course you will get to know about most of these in the end. But casually. They will come out bit by bit, to furnish an illustration or an analogy, to serve as pegs for an anecdote; never for their own sake. That is the kingliness of Friendship. We meet like sovereign princes of independent states, abroad, on neutral ground, freed from our contexts.

 

This love (essentially) ignores not only our physical bodies but that whole embodiment which consists of our family, job, past and connections. At home, besides being Peter or Jane, we also bear a general character; husband or wife, brother or sister, chief, colleague, or subordinate. Not among our Friends. It is an affair of disentangled, or stripped, minds. Eros will have naked bodies; Friendship naked personalities.

 

Hence (if you will not misunderstand me) the exquisite arbitrariness and irresponsibility of this love. I have no duty to be anyone’s Friend and no man in the world has a duty to be mine. No claims, no shadow of necessity. Friendship is unnecessary, like philosophy, like art, like the universe itself… It has no survival value; rather it is one of those things which gave value to survival.

Birthday Dread?

doggybdayUm…Today’s my birthday.

At first I thought I’d be all weirded out…you know ….being 29 for so long… and whatnot, but that’s not what happened at all.

I just stopped wearing my glassing when I looked in the mirror and things got better.

(Great photo, right? Pugs just have this certain aptitude for conveying feelings.)

 

Want to make my birthday special?

But one of my books or check out my birthday wish list at amazon.

Books:

KINDLE books:

1. “Dog in the Gap: Brief Explorations on Canine Care-Taking and Human Flourishing”

2. Dog in the Gap BONUS EDITION.

3. Life As Prayer: Revived Spirituality Inspired by Ancient Piety (Brother Lawrence makes a great spiritual mentor. This book is great if you want to increase a felt awareness of God’s presence throughout you whole day, and was part of a Devotional Classic Project in Seminary.)

4.  Love You, (in Theory)

5. Soul Care for Creators and Communicators (Inspiration, Soul Care, and great advice for those of us who create and communication. This helps you fill up your tank to keep on with your calling. shot. in. the. arm.)

6. Sparky’s Go-to Guide for Dream Control

 

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